MOBILE CINEMA COMES TO SHEFFIELD - No Fixed Abode

Sheffield based arts project No Fixed Abode, working in conjunction with Sheffield City Council's mobile library service, will be touring a mobile cinema around Sheffield for one day only.

The cinema, a converted 1970's Sprite caravan, will be traveling alongside the usual mobile library service screening a selection of short films at its various stops.

The caravan is on loan from an arts organisation based in Newcastle and will screen a variety of films from around the UK as well as international films from America, Canada, Belgium and France.

This project has been developed in response to the various cultural strategies of Sheffield and the country as a whole. These aim at bringing empowerment for a city's Citizenry through established cultural institutions such as the city's libraries. The Mobile Cinema functions in a very similar way to a mobile library. It has the ability to travel to those areas not serviced by a cinema and bring the cultural enrichment that the contemporary city wishes for all.

Fri 27 Apr 2007

The cinema will be calling at:

10.50 - 11.30 - Busk Meadows
11.40 - 12.30 - Firshill Croft, Firshill
1.45 - 2.30 - Manor Park Centre, Manor Park
2.35 - 3.05 - Manor Park Close, Manor Park
3.15 - 4.00 - Benson Road, Wybourn

No Fixed Abode at BLOC Assembly
Fri 27 Apr 2007


Modern Times

In response to the theme of text, No Fixed Abode will be using a mobile cinema to screen sections of Charlie Chaplin's last silent film Modern Times. Chaplin plays a tramp struggling to survive in the modern, industrialised world of 1936. Preparations for the film as his first "talkie" were undertaken, and went as far as writing a dialogue and experimenting with some sound scenes. However, these attempts were soon abandoned, reverting to a silent format with synchronized sound effects. The only attainable dialogue in the film is in the text screens that direct and narrate the action throughout. Notably though, this is the only film in which Chaplin's voice is ever heard, singing pseudo-Italian gibberish. Through the artist's intervention within this, a new text body will be offered throughout the film, with reflections on the political undercurrents which it holds and how these may translate today.